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20120801
20120831
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
last second decisions on its own. with no help from the engineers at j.p.l. >> as far as the amount of control that the team has during entry, descent and landing, it's identical to the control that anybody watching at home has. we're all along for the ride. >> reporter: scientists can only watch as the last seven minutes of this ambitious mission determines the outcome says cbs news space analyst bill harwell. >> if it is a success it will be one of the great scientific triumphs of the space-age and if it fails i think it could be a setback for interplanetary exploration. >> reporter: the mission is to search for evidence that mars once could support life, an exploration that is expected to last two years. >> glor: what kind of tools and equipment does the rover have? >> well, it begins with the mask there that has a number of cameras on it to capture detailed panoramic images of regard mars as you have never seen before. other than that it is equipped to do what a human geologist would do on mars. pick up samples of rock and soil and then run them through an onboard laboratory to
think it's in the 9s. those engineers at jpl are really good. >> landing on mars has been a tricky thing. 70% of the missions that landed on mars have failed. that's both the u.s. and with russia as well. what are the factors that complicate this? >> the atmosphere of mars is thick enough to heat your spacecraft and melt it on the way in if you don't slow down in the right way. it's thin enough that it's hard to slow down. it's a delicate balance between slowing down fast enough and not slowing down at all. that's what takes this incredibly complicated heat shield parachute rocket sky crane maneuver. >> not to mention, this is something that scientists won't be seeing in real time. there's going to be a delay. why? >> well, it takes 14 minutes at this point for light to get from mars to earth. radio signals too. so this lander will be on the surface of mars in one piece or many for seven minutes before the signal gets back to earth to tell us that it's successful or not. >> we've had missions like this before. what makes this one different in. >> well, this one, it's the size of a smart
billion or more a piece have largely paid back the money. can you name some of the major banks? guest: jpl morgan, citibank -- j.p. morgan, citibank, goldman sachs paid back tarp. initially, $125 billion was given to the largest banks and it quickly paid back. host: and banks worth less than $10 billion a piece, and moneys outstanding versus what they paid back. what is it about the smaller banks giving them a harder time? guest: a lot of the smaller banks are not as healthy as the big banks. they also don't have easy access to the capital market, so it is harder for them to go out and raise capital to pay it back. host: here is a piece that you wrote for bloomberg a couple of weeks ago. the u.s. treasury department said it started selling stakes today -- first of all, why get out of it? why is of the treasury department trying to extricate itself from these banks? guest: hutras reece says it was never intended to be a lifelong shareholder of banks, so it was natural they would eventually get out. i think they are realistic probably will not do with this year. and probably will continue in
the way. quick trivia, on the wheels of the curiosity rover is morse code and translates to jpl, the jet propulsion laboratory where they were doing the fist pumps and the high five's when it landed. there you go. >> news you can use this morning. seven minutes after the hour and a big controversy, an ex navy seal catching the pentagon completely by surprise, a man that claims he was a member of the u.s. navy seal team six is coming out with a book about the raid that killed osama bin laden. the title," no easy day," the release day september 11, 2012, and they say it is a pen name and the author they say is no longer on active duty. we'll have a live report coming up later in the hour. >>> it is one of the biggest outbreaks of the west nile virus in this country ever before. we'll tell you what you need to know next. becoming a fulltime indoor cat wasn't easy for atti. but he had purina cat chow indoor. he absolutely loved it. and i knew he was getting everything he needed to stay healthy indoors. and after a couple of weeks, i knew we were finally home! [ female announcer ] purina cat
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)